Theresa Hak Kyung Cha


REGINA PYO’s Collection

ckck:

Untitled #96 by Cindy Sherman, 1981.
Now also known as the most expensive photo in the world after being sold at a Christie’s auction in New York City yesterday for $3,890,500. The previous record holder was Andreas Gursky’s 99 Cent II Diptychon, which sold for 3.35 million dollars at an auction in 2006.


Moira Ricci

Some images in the series are black and white, some coloured by hand and some yellowed by time. We understand from this and numerous other details that the photographs date from different periods, and from their amateurish snapshot aesthetic that they all form part of a family album featuring the same people in different situations and stages in their lives. Another constant presence is the figure of a slim young woman with long black hair, upon whom time seems to leave no trace. 
Moira Ricci delves into the photographs of the past following the tracks of her mother, whose dates of birth and death provide the series with its title and indicate the time span covered by the images. Digital processing of old family photographs enables the artist to appear beside and observe her mother while remaining an extraneous figure, a sort of ubiquitous ghost hovering on the edges of the images and events. 

More here.


Some images in the series are black and white, some coloured by hand and some yellowed by time. We understand from this and numerous other details that the photographs date from different periods, and from their amateurish snapshot aesthetic that they all form part of a family album featuring the same people in different situations and stages in their lives. Another constant presence is the figure of a slim young woman with long black hair, upon whom time seems to leave no trace. Moira Ricci delves into the photographs of the past following the tracks of her mother, whose dates of birth and death provide the series with its title and indicate the time span covered by the images. Digital processing of old family photographs enables the artist to appear beside and observe her mother while remaining an extraneous figure, a sort of ubiquitous ghost hovering on the edges of the images and events. 



In order to shoot scenes underwater, Painlevé encased his camera in a custom designed waterproof box, fitted with a glass plate which allowed the camera’s lens to reach through. Understandably, he spent a lot of time submerged in water. In his 1935 essay, titled “Feet In The Water”, Painlevé discussed wading, its instinctive, sensual pleasure and thwarted desire: “Wading around in water up to your ankles or navel, day and night, in all kinds of weather, even in areas where one is sure to find nothing, digging about everywhere for algae or octopus, getting hypnotised by a sinister pond where everything seems to promise marvels although nothing lives there. This is the ecstasy of any addict.”